In-Between

credit: Graphic Print Solutions

Look up! It’s new public art along NE Holladay Street. Titled “In-Between,” the banners are part of Portland’s Percent For Art program made possible by the new Oregon Convention Center parking structure. With text by Brooklyn-born artist, Hank Willis Thomas, and photographs by local artist, Intisar Abioto, the artwork transforms five utility poles in the street median to hold ten large banners, displayed in pairs. The exhibit kicks off an on-going art banner series that will be refreshed every six months with new works by different artists.


As the lead urban designer for the parking garage, it was such a rewarding experience to serve on the art selection committee with partners from the neighborhood, local artists, Portland Art Museum, Prosper Portland and Metro. Many thanks to Peggy Kendellen at the Regional Arts and Culture Council (RACC) for her vision and guidance throughout this process in the spirit of innovation. Through the synthesis of team brainstorming our committee discovered a path forward by questioning, “Who are we, how did we get here and where are we going?” all while dealing with a very visible, complex, and congested urban site. We have deep appreciation for both artists – Intisar Abioto and Hank Willis Thomas – for their melding of talents, curatorship of their combined works and synergy to bring this work to fruition. It’s not often we find a single installation speaking in such a clear voice to convey collaboration, respect, historic truth telling and beauty.

Renovated Oregon Convention Center Reveals New Public Open Space, Enhanced Wayfinding

Designers, contractors and community leaders recently celebrated the completed renovation of the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, Oregon. The major upgrade elevates the visitor experience – indoors and out – at the largest event venue in the Pacific Northwest.

The new outdoor environment designed by Mayer/Reed adds a hospitality terrace and events plaza and improves pedestrian circulation throughout the site.
An identity pylon of weathering steel and luminous glass marks the main entry.
Inside the building, our signage design complements LMN Architects’ renovated interiors with internally illuminated wayfinding pylons that glow as landmarks within the large volume spaces.

Mayer/Reed Projects and Staff Honored with 2019 ASLA Oregon Awards

Each fall we look forward to celebrating design with the Oregon landscape architecture community at the annual Oregon ASLA Awards Soiree. This year we are proud to share that two Mayer/Reed projects and one Mayer/Reed landscape architect took home honors.Representatives from Mayer/Reed and the City of Portland accepted an honor award in analysis & planning for the Green Loop, a concept and planning framework for a continuous pedestrian and bicycle trail encircling Portland’s inner city utilizing existing street rights-of-way as its network.

A second honor award, this one in the category of community service, went to our pro-bono Portland Winter Light Festival installation – Kinetic DeLight. Crafted of 700 human-powered LED skateboard wheels on a custom steel frame, the exhibit invited visitors to spin streaks of light, offering both touch and visual sensations. Kinetic DeLight will be making a re-appearance at the free 2020 Portland Winter Light Festival in February.In addition, Mayer/Reed landscape architect, Shannon Simms, received the President’s Chapter Service Award in recognition of her outstanding volunteer service on behalf of the chapter and the profession.

New Prize Named for Pioneering Landscape Architect Cornelia Oberlander

The Cornelia Hahn Oberlander Prize in Landscape Architecture is a newly-established, international prize established by The Cultural Landscapes Foundation. The prize will be awarded every other year to practitioners whose landscapes are deemed to be particularly significant, influential and enduring. The work of these individuals are legacy landscapes that promote the best of our profession through excellence and stewardship, along with an increased awareness for the value of design and of our profession.

The prize is named after the influential Cornelia Oberlander who is a landscape architect practicing in Vancouver BC. She has inspired me since the mid-1970s when I was a graduate student. I was impressed with her ability to achieve such a seamless integration of building and landscape.  Since that time, she and her work have strongly influenced me in my own practice here in the Pacific Northwest.

Cornelia has played a significant role in the evolution of our profession; and I’m delighted to see this TCLF program honor her with the naming of the International Landscape Architecture Prize. I’m pleased to participate as part of the 100 Women who have enabled the initial round of funding for this important program.

Posted: Oct 02, 2019
Written by: Carol Mayer-Reed, FASLA
Posted October 02, 2019
Written by: Carol Mayer-Reed, FASLA
Categories: AWARDS  COMMUNITY